France Slaps Google With Fines, Remedial Measures

http://hollisibzh.skyrock.com/3200965059-On-The-Scene-Kanye-West-s-yeezus-Tour-Hits-Madison-Square-Garden.html Finally, it permits itself to combine all the data it collects about its users across all of its services without any legal basis. CNIL's announcement also noted that data protection regulatory groups in Spain and the Netherlands came to similar conclusions in November and December of last year. Google took a noncommittal stance in its response to CNIL's demands. "We've engaged fully with main page the CNIL throughout this process to explain our privacy policy and how it allows us to create simpler, more effective services. We'll be reading their report closely to determine next steps," said a Google spokesperson. Update, 1:50 p.m.
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France fines Google over data privacy

In the Goodyear case, for instance, it was the local police that interfered, not the French government. "If that happened here, they'd send in the National Guard," he says. MORE: Why Roku TV will save the company In one of the few instances in which a French worker received punishment for his civil disobedience against a company, Jose Bove, a farmer and activist who in 1999 helped dismantle the construction site of a new McDonald's ( MCD ), gained hero status and became a martyr for disgruntled workers. At his trial, an estimated 40,000 people showed up in support of his cause. To be sure, bossnappings have taken place in other countries.
More: http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2014/01/08/bossnapping-france/?source=yahoo_quote

France slaps Google with fine, remedial measure

"Throughout our talks with CNIL, we have explained our privacy policy and how it allows us to create simpler and more efficient services," he said. Spain, Britain, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands have also opened similar cases against Google because the U.S.-based web giant's privacy policy introduced in 2012 does not conform with local rules protecting consumers on how their personal data is processed and stored. CNIL said the fine is the highest it has issued until now and is justified by the number and the seriousness of the breaches stated in the case. But the penalties that France and most other EU countries can impose remain small compared with the $10.7 billion net profit that Google earned in 2012. Spain can impose fines of up to 1 million euros, while the German Data Protection Act caps penalties at 300,000 euros. There is no legal framework to levy European-wide fines. In June, CNIL found Google to be in breach of privacy law on six counts, notably that it posted "insufficient" information for French users about how their private browsing data was collected home page and used.
More: http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/01/08/france-google-fine-idINDEEA070EP20140108

Why bossnappings and France are like baguette and brie

Google was found at fault for not sufficiently protecting its customers' personal data in four instances: The company does not sufficiently inform its users of the conditions in which official website their personal data are processed, nor of the purposes of this processing. They may therefore neither understand the purposes for which their data are collected, which are not specific as the law requires, nor the ambit of the data collected through the different services concerned. Consequently, they are not able to exercise their rights, in particular their right of access, objection or deletion. The company does not comply with its obligation to obtain user consent prior to the storage of cookies on their terminals. It fails to define retention periods applicable to the data which it processes. Finally, it permits itself to combine all the data it collects about its users across all of its services without any legal basis.
More: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57616888-93/france-slaps-google-with-fine-remedial-measure/

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